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IN THE NEWS

USA Fencing: Bonn Cadet European Cup 2018


https://www.usafencing.org/news_article/show/971853

(L-R): Coach Dwight Smith, silver medalist Isaac Herbst, gold medalist Nicholas Lawson, Coach Sergey Danilov and top-eight finisher Skyler Liverant. Photo Credit: Sergey Danilov.

Lawson and Herbst Go 1-2 at Bonn Cadet European Cup

By Kristen Henneman
November 27, 2018
USA Fencing

(Colorado Springs, Colo.) – Podium finishes at Cadet European Cups have become the norm for Nicholas Lawson (New York, N.Y.) and Isaac Herbst (Houston, Texas) as the two Americans won gold and silver in Bonn this past Saturday.

Lawson has now medaled at two of his last three Cadet European Cups, winning his first gold in Germany over the weekend. Herbst, a 2018 Youth Olympic team bronze medalist, had finished on the podium at the last four Cadet European Cups he’s attended dating back to November of 2017.

The final between the Americans would be their second matchup this month as Herbst defeated Lawson 15-11 in the semifinals at the November North American Cup. This time it would be Lawson’s turn to come out on top, but only by a point as the match for gold went down to the final touch, 15-14, in Lawson’s favor.

Both Lawson and Herbst went 5-1 in pools before holding their table of 128 opponent to single digits as Lawson overcame teammate Colin Neibergall (Lone Tree, Colo.), 15-8, and Herbst bested Alexander Ebnoether (SUI), 15-5.

After edging out Fabio Murru (GER), 15-12, in the table of 64, Lawson defeated teammate Stafford Moosekian (Los Angeles, Calif.), 15-10, and Iino Heurlin-Vazquez (FRA), 15-6.

A 15-8 victory in the quarter-finals over Niels Roubailo (NED), and a 15-11 win against Matteo Wicht (SUI) guaranteed Lawson a spot in the gold medal final.

Herbst controlled his first two bouts against Tobias Schulz (GER) and Pierreck Rousseau (FRA) by scores of 15-8 and 15-9, respectively.

With a 15-10 victory over Allan Diane (FRA) in the 16, Herbst advanced to the quarters, where he faced Diane’s teammate, Paul Fortin (FRA).

Herbst continued to cruise, guaranteeing a medal with a 15-8 victory over Fortin and earning the opportunity to fence for gold with a 15-5 win against Jonathan Fuhrimann (SUI).

Herbst and Lawson currently rank No. 1 and 2 in the Cadet European Fencing Standings.

Competing at just his second Cadet European Cup, fourteen-year-old Skyler Liverant (Brooklyn, N.Y.) claimed his first top-eight result.

Liverant picked up quick victories against two Frenchmen in this first two bouts, outscoring Tristan Turakiewicz, 15-6, and Vincent Macarez, 15-7.

Following a 15-12 victory over teammate Daniel Gaidar (Staten Island, N.Y.) in the 32, Liverant advanced to the 16 for the first time in his career and held off Theo Brochard (SUI), 15-11. However, Liverant came up one win short of a medal, falling to Fuhrimann, 15-12.

In the newly released USA Fencing Men’s Epee Cadet Team Point Standings, Herbst has a strong grasp on first place with more than a 2,000 point lead over Liverant as he seeks to qualify for a second Cadet World Team in 2019. Lawson ranks third, holding a slim lead of less than 100 points over Moosekian.

In the team event on Sunday, USA 2 came within one point of a medal, finishing fourth. The United States had five teams competing in Bonn with two earning top-eight results and two taking top-16 finishes.

Represented by Liverant, Mossekian, Michael Mun (Tustin, Calif.) and Ethan Nguyen (Las Vegas, Nev.), Team USA went 4-1 on the day after entering as the 12th seed.

Despite dropping the first bout to Germany 3 in the table of 32, the Americans won or tied the next five to create enough of a cushion and go on to win, 39-32.

In the 16, USA 2 blazed past Poland 4, 45-27, only dropping one bout throughout the match.

The United States earned a come-from-behind victory over Germany in the quarter-finals. Down 16-13 after four rounds, USA 2 won or tied the next four, including 13-5 victory in the eighth, to secure a 45-36 win and a place in the medal rounds.

Continuing its momentum, the U.S. squad went up 14-9 after the first three bouts, but couldn’t hold on against Poland 1, falling, 45-33.

In the bronze medal match, USA 2 once again built a lead after three rounds at 15-11, but Switzerland 1 responded the following bout to take a one-point lead at 19-18. The Americans took control in the next four rounds to take a three-point lead into the final bout, but Switzerland finished strong to secure a medal, 45-44.

Click here to view complete results.

Top eight and U.S. results are as follows:

Bonn Men’s Individual Épée Cadet European Cup
1. Nicholas Lawson (New York, N.Y.)
2. Isaac Herbst (Houston, Texas)

3. Matteo Wicht (SUI)
3. Jonathan Fuhrimann (SUI)
5. Jan Bulandra (POL)
6. Niels Roubailo (NED)
7. Paul Fortin (FRA)
8. Skyler Liverant (Brooklyn, N.Y.)

18. Ethan Kushnerik (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
23. Daniel Gaidar (Staten Island, N.Y.)
24. Stafford Moosekian (Los Angeles, Calif.)
28. Spencer Vermeule (Cambridge, Mass.)
33. Mihir Kumashi (Houston, Texas)
35. Justin Haddad (Bethesda, Md.)
37. Daniel Shifron (Del Mar, Calif.)
39. Miles Weiss (Houston, Texas)
40. Mateusz Kozlowski (The Woodlands, Texas)
44. Aaron Lee (Las Vegas, Nev.)
55. Daniel Ra (New City, N.Y.)
60. Gabriel Insler (Providence, R.I.)
68. Ethan Nguyen (Las Vegas, Nev.)
73. Michael Mun (Tustin, Calif.)
107. Colin Neibergall (Lone Tree, Colo.)
165. Ethan Kim (Leesburg, Va.)
177. Russell Cha (Closter, N.J.)

Bonn Men’s Team Épée Cadet European Cup
1. Poland
2. Switzerland 2
3. Switzerland 1
4. USA 2
5. USA

6. Germany
7. France 2
8. USA 4

11. USA 5
13. USA 3

IN THE NEWS

These kids are sharp: Kings County fencers score big at national tournament


https://www.brooklyndaily.com/stories/2018/47/all-standing-o-main-2018-23-bk.html

By Colin Mixson
November 23, 2018
Brooklyn Daily

On point: Midwood High School sophomore Jaclyn Khrol, who earned bronze at a Kansas City fencing competition earlier this month, celebrates with coach Misha Mokretsov.

Two Kings County fencers scored big at a national tournament held in Missouri last weekend, including one freshman at a Windsor Terrace charter school who defeated grown men six years his senior, his coach said.

“Skyler is only 14 and was having a blast fencing some of the best 17–20 year olds in the country, so when he beat them, he was ecstatic,” said New York Fencing Academy coach Misha Mokretsov, boasting of champ Skyler Liverant.

Liverant, who started school at Brooklyn Prospect Charter High School earlier this year, earned fifth place in the Juniors category usually reserved for competitors four years his senior, and is now ranked number two nationally, putting him in the running for a national fencing squad to represent the United States at the 2019 Jr. Olympics, according to his coach.

Midwood High School sophomore Jaclyn Khrol (inset with coach Mokretsov) also gave a stellar performance, earning bronze in Juniors just a week before the 15-year-old is expected to represent Team USA at the Junior World Cup fencing tournament in Puerto Rico.

And Jaclyn’s sister, eighth-grader Caralina Khrol, seems to be following in her sibling’s footsteps, as the youngster took home a bronze medal in the under-14 group.

IN THE NEWS

Hewlett Senior Wins National Title


http://www.liherald.com/fivetowns/stories/hewlett-senior-wins-national-title,109419

Hewlett High School senior Alan Temiryaev, second from right, captured his second junior national fencing title. From left Ian Sanders, Steven Grams, Howard Zhao, Skyler Liverant, Jonathan Piskovatskov, Ryan Griffiths, Temiryaev and Isaac Herbst.

 

By Jeff Bessen
November 21, 2018
Long Island Herald

Alan Temiryaev, a senior at Hewlett High, won his second junior national title at the North American Cup in Kansas City, Mo., from Nov. 9 to 12. The victory buoys the New York Fencing Academy member’ chances of making the U.S. Junior National team after a seesaw start to his fencing season.

“I won my first four bouts, then twisted my ankle badly and lost the next two,” said Temiryaev, who has who has verbally committed to fence at Columbia University. “But I’m glad I was able to overcome the pain and win.”

He had to defeat his club mates, New York University fencer Sam Bekker and Skyler Liverant, and then upended World Championship silver medalist, Ryan Griffiths and Youth Olympics bronze medalist, Isaac Herbst, in the finals. Temiryaev’s next competition is at the World Cups in Riga, Latvia and in Luxembourg.

 

IN THE NEWS

Port Washington Says En Garde


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http://portwashington-news.com/port-washington-says-en-garde/

By Christina Claus
April 26, 2018
Port Washington News

The red ribbon is cut at the newly opened New York Fencing Academy.

The Port Washington Chamber of Commerce welcomed New York Fencing Academy, the number one ranked fencing club in youth épée by National Fencing Club Rankings, to the town with a grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony. The fencing club’s second location on Haven Avenue, with its first in Brooklyn, was opened to offer its successful training programs for ages six and up to the Long Island fencing community.

“I’ve been looking for this space for a long time and we have a good amount of students coming from Long Island on a weekly basis,” said owner Michael Mokretsov. “It’s hard for them to go during the week days, so training only on the weekends you cannot achieve too much. Even though they were getting good results, we wanted to help them boost it a little and provide the service closer so they can train more on a weekly basis and not just on the weekends coming to Brooklyn.”

Town Clerk Wayne Wink, Marina Temiryaev, Owner and Head Coach Michael Mokretsov, Nassau County Legislator Delia Deriggi-Whitton, Fred Pollock representing Tony Durso, and President of the Chamber Mitch Schwartz

New York Fencing Academy offers introductory packages, private lessons, group classes, after-school programs, membership benefits, parties, day camps, and summer épée camps. Mokretsov explained many high schools around the area including Great Neck North and South, Manhasset and Jericho offer fencing for students, and he hopes students will be able to use the new facility for training as well.

“There is no fencing club here in Port Washington,” said Mokretsov. “We’re opening a club that never existed here. Second, we will try to work with all the high schools around so that off-season they can train. We’ll also be conducting competitions and summer camps. It’s actually the biggest épée camp in the country. It’s a great program we’re running and we hope it will be a good boost for the kids.”

Many may think that because fencing utilizes weapons, or épées, it could be harmful; however, Mokretsov explained that it is one of the safest sports because the equipment is made so that students cannot obtain weapon-related injuries. Another safe factor of fencing is that it is not a contact sport.

While fencing offers physical benefits like improving strength, coordination and agility, Mokretsov also explained that there are many mental benefits to fencing.

“It’s a strategic sport,” said Mokretsov. “It’s like a physical chess because there are so many combinations and you have to figure it out, predict their moves and figure out your strategy two, three or four moves ahead of them. It’s also working under pressure. It teaches you discipline, the same as any other sport, teaches you how to achieve goals under pressure, which is a very valuable skill when you get older. This teaches you a lot and it’s a great way of getting into a college program as well.”

New York Fencing Academy is located at 8 Haven Ave., Suite LL3, Port Washington and is open Monday through Friday from 4 to 9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. by appointment. For more information about New York Fencing Academy, visit www.fencenyfa.com.

IN THE NEWS

World Class Fencing Comes to Port Washington


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https://theislandnow.com/uncategorized/world-class-fencing-comes-to-port-washington/

By Luke Torrance
April 11, 2018
The Island Now

Michael Mokretsov with three of his students at a fencing event last year. (Photo courtesy of NYFA)

Michael Mokretsov loves fencing.

It began when he first tried the sport at age 12 in his hometown of Khmelnitsky, Ukraine. That love led him to a silver medal in the Ukraine National Championship, to travel to the United States to fence for St. John’s University, and then to open a fencing academy in Brooklyn and now, Port Washington.

“It is interesting to work with the kids, to share the experience and grow in a different way of perceiving fencing,” he said of coaching. “And it helped me with fencing because I had to start thinking more.”

Mokretsov said he played basketball and danced when he was younger, but was drawn to fencing by its mental component and the variety of outcomes.

“A match against one person can be completely different each time,” he said. “You have to make decisions. There is strategy. It isn’t all physical.”

For several years as a teenager, Mokretsov was a member of Ukraine’s national team, competing in tournaments around Europe and the world. He was a finalist in the European Championship team event in 2004.

In 2006, he left Ukraine for the United States, where he had received a scholarship to fence for St. John’s University.

“Many colleges have fencing scholarships,” he said. “And the scholarships are not that competitive compared to tennis or basketball since it is a niche sport.”

At St. John’s, he earned All-American honors in 2008 and served as team captain and manager.

Fencing dominated his life, and so he was unsure what to do when he graduated in 2010. The economy was in the midst of a recession and jobs were hard to find. He had already spent the previous four years volunteering as a fencing coach, so he decided to open New York Fencing Academy in Brooklyn.

“It was scary, but it became very successful,” he said. “For 14 and younger, we were rated number one in the country.”

Mokretsov’s students, many of whom he has coached since they were 9, have won medals around the world. Speaking in his empty Port Washington studio a week before it was set to open, he mentioned that he had just returned with some of his students from a world championship in Italy.

As to why he had chosen Port Washington for his second location, Mokretsov said he wanted to have another practice space closer to some of his students, and he had many in the Port Washington area.

“We have many students coming from Long Island, and it is hard for them to train at a high level if they can only come on weekends,” he said.

Students as young as 6 can join the Fencing Academy. Mokretsov said he starts off by teaching them positions and how to hold the weapon, and recommends that students take four private lessons before taking the group classes.

“For the kids, it’s fun because you get to use a weapon,” he said, and then noted that fencing was one of the safest sports to play.

Even though most of his students are younger, Mokretsov said one of his favorite things about fencing is that it is a sport you can participate in, and get better at, regardless of age and body type.

“We have tall and short, we have slow and fast, those less physically strong can defeat an opponent with strategy,” he said. “We have veterans, guys over 60, who fence. And some who are 40 can get the best results of their life because they have experience.”