fencing

BLOG, CLUB NEWS, fencing, Parents

Where Do I Start?


By Sergey Danilov

Where do I start? That’s a common question for anyone new to a sport. Let’s say your friend brought you to fencing and they’ve been doing it for a while. Then you have someone you can turn to for help with some of your questions… But what if you discovered fencing by watching the Olympics or a movie…or you simply have more questions?

Well, you’ve come to the club for a reason. You did some research and decided to give your trust to your club and your coach. Good, the first step is done.

1. Communicate with your Coach directly

While it seems like your Coach is too busy all the time, please remember that the Coach is there for you. Find the time and politely push to get an answer to your question. After all, you know very little about the sport and you deserve to have some answers. You chose to learn from the Coach for a reason: because he/she has expertise in this sport. But it’s important to realize that the Coach’s expertise goes beyond teaching technique and showing how to “stab” an opponent. The Coach also has a wealth of knowledge about how best to set your training schedule (how often, when, and what training you need based on your goals), nutrition, time management, and more. So don’t be afraid to “bother” the Coach. Believe it or not, Coaches are also inquisitive and curious by nature, just like their students.

2. Set your goals

Well, this one, we believe, is very important during your journey in the sport. The goal makes you train harder, not only on regular days, but also on those days when you do not want to. On days when you do not perform the way you like, goals can help you focus on the tasks and training, and can remind you to put aside other things that won’t help (like electronics and social media.)

Also, setting your goals should come from your heart. No one can push you hard enough except you. Coaches can motivate you, guide you in the right direction, help you to push yourself, maybe help you find motivation, but at the end of the day, your motivation should come from YOU. This will drive you in the sport to the highest possible results you desire. Of course, over time, your goals may change… well, whatever it is, remember the advice in the first paragraph – you need to discuss it with your Coach.

3. 21st Century, time of the Internet…so let’s talk about paragraph #1 again

You chose the sport, you learned the basics, and now you are dreaming about becoming an  Olympic Champion, NCAA Champion, or High School Champion. You start researching the Internet and find so much information (equipment, supportive training, fencing videos, advice and much more) that now you’re getting lost. Well, we come back to where it started. Before committing to some “cool” looking exercises, buying an extremely good-looking piece of equipment, or following a certain “direction” in your training routine, communicate with your Coach. In our opinion, if you decide to trust the Coach, trust all the way. At the end of the day, your Coach knows you the best, well at least in fencing, and he/she knows what is best for you so your performance can be effective.

4. Tournaments

The last stage is when you decide to become competitive. And you discover that there are numerous tournaments and events, starting from little local events, to regionals (RYC, SYC, RCC, RJCC) and nationals (NAC, etc.) — the list can be extensive. In fact, there is an event every weekend in the drivable distance for you. Here is where you have to be very careful. Going to events, gaining experience, becoming a stronger fencer, is important. But on the other hand, training, mastering the skill, learning new skills, is also important for your competitive performance. So, you have to learn to find the right balance, choose wisely when to go to a competition and when it’s better to stay at the gym and train. And who knows best??  Yes, you are right again – the Coach!!

To conclude, trust the professionals that you chose to learn from. They did not become experts right away – they went through all the ups and downs, mistakes and successes, defeats and victories themselves and with many, many other students, and now they are here for you, helping you to avoid those obstacles. Oh well, sometimes you will still run into them – and your Coach will help you to overcome them.

So, listen, learn, and always ask your Coach!

CLUB NEWS, fencing

Coach Alex Zurabishvili Joins New York Fencing Academy


Please join us in welcoming Coach Alex Zurabishvili as Head Coach of NYFA-Westchester! Alex brings over 20 years of experience as epee coach at clubs throughout the New York Metropolitan area and as Designated Coach for Team USA. In addition to joining NYFA’s coaching team, Alex is epee coach at Columbia University and NY Athletic Club.

Click below for his bio

Alex Zurabishvili, NYFA-W Head Coach

CLUB NEWS, fencing

NYFA Expands to Westchester In Port Chester


We are proud to announce the grand opening of our third location:
New York Fencing Academy in Westchester
See club details and special promotions below!

NEW YORK FENCING ACADEMY-W
21 N Main Street, 3rd floor
Port Chester, NY 10573

Club: (914) 305-4597

NYFA-W HOURS

Mondays: 3 pm – 9 pm
Tuesdays: 3 pm – 9 pm
Wednesdays: by appointment
Thursdays: 3 pm – 9 pm
Fridays: by appointment
Saturdays: 10 am – 4 pm

NYFA-W SPECIAL OFFERS

  • FREE MEMBERSHIP: for 2021-22 season! (until 8/31/22, Westchester location only)
  • FREE CLASS: Call for our introductory offer!

CLASSES & LESSONS

See our schedule of group classes and bouting sessions, and book your private lessons during club hours at your convenience.

NYFA-W HEAD COACH

Coach Alex Zurabishvili is Head Coach of NYFA’s Westchester location. He is also the epee coach for Columbia University.

NYFA BENEFITS

NYFA has been named Fencing Club of the Year for two years in a row and ranked #1 in youth epee per National Fencing Club Rankings. NYFA students from all of our locations are members of the same great team with world-class training from our dedicated and accomplished coaches.  All members receive the same membership benefits, and are welcome to fence together at our bouting practices, our day camps, and our popular sleep-away summer camps. They can also do make-ups at any NYFA location.

NYFA-W FACILITIES

Our Westchester club is a state-of-the-art 3,854 square foot facility with 10 fencing strips. There are two rooms: one with 6 strips and another with 4.

In addition to the main gym, we will also have a separate stretching area and a study area.

NYFA-W LOCATION / DIRECTIONS

NYFA-W is located at 21 N Main Street on the 3rd floor, in Port Chester, near Westchester Avenue.

By train: Metro-North Port Chester station is right across the street.
By car: A few miles from exit 21 off I-95N or exit 2 off of I-95S. Click map above to get directions.

Parking: Free 3-hour parking in the lot behind the building and metered street parking is available.

fencing, IN THE NEWS

Long Island coach celebrates Romain Cannone’s Olympic gold


August 6, 2021
by News 12 Long Island

https://longisland.news12.com/long-island-coach-celebrates-romain-cannons-olympic-gold-in-fencing

Michael Mokretsov, who owns the New York Fencing Academy in Port Washington, just got a little more popular now that he successfully coached Romain Cannone to win Olympic gold.

While Cannone isn’t a Long Islander, Mokretsov is. He lives in Woodmere and has worked with Cannone since he was 12 years old.

“When he started, he was a regular kid,” says Mokretesov. “He wasn’t super strong or super-fast. There was nothing specific to tell about him to say OK an Olympic champion walking in the gym.”

Alan Temiryaev was Cannone’s former training partner. Temiryaev says Romain worked hard. He also says don’t be surprised if another gold medalist comes out of the Port Washington club.

“Definitely sets the bar high and now it makes me feel like I have to do it so see you guys in 2028 LA,” says Temiryaev.

fencing, IN THE NEWS

Who is Romain Cannone, the Olympic champion that nobody expected at the Olympics?


July 25, 2021
by Ijaz Ibrahim

https://cceverybody.com/who-is-romain-cannone-the-olympic-champion-that-nobody-expected-at-the-olympics/

PORTRAIT – The French swordsman has not experienced a trajectory like the others to become Olympic champion at 24 years old. His first medal on the international scene in individual. The most beautiful.

Special envoy to Tokyo

He lived his childhood in Brazil, then in the United States

If Romain Cannone was indeed born in France on April 12, 1997, near Boulogne-Billancourt, he did not stay there very long, then following his parents to Brazil to live his first school years in kindergarten. Before another great upheaval and a departure for New York, where his parents decide to launch a macaroon shop. And it is in the Big Apple that he will discover fencing at the age of 9, under the leadership of his cousin Zoey who pushes him to try foil, before becoming a star of his school. of Coney Island, the New York Fencing Academy (NYFA).

He has a Ukrainian mentor

The one who shaped the not very academic but very spectacular fencing of Cannone is called Misha Mokretsov. The meeting between the two occurs in 2010, when the Frenchman is still only 13 years old. At the time, it was more intended for the practice of foil, before changing to épée, convinced by Mokretsov, a former silver medalist in his country, Ukraine. Together, they will continue their journey, which made Cécile Cannone, Romain’s mother, say on the NYFA website: “Mokretsov is a true fencing enthusiast and he knows how to pass this on to his students. But the two of them are actually much more than student teachers to each other. It’s a very deep friendship, and he gives Romain great advice in many areas of his life.“

He shouldn’t have played his games

An Olympic title sometimes comes down to little. Initially selected as a replacement for the team event, Cannone was not expected to compete in the individual competition in Tokyo. An honor that should have gone to Daniel Jerent (30), both reigning Olympic champion and world champion in 2019, both times in the team event. Except that the latter, targeted by an investigation by the French Agency for the Fight against Doping (AFLD) for a positive control for a diuretic, Dorzolamide, was finally ruled out by the French Fencing Federation. A decision taken according to an extremely simple precautionary principle: by keeping Jerent in the team, the Federation took the risk, one day, of losing their possible medal on the green carpet if the swordsman was found guilty (which is not the case. case for now). A principle which therefore made Cannone happy.

He has never been on an international individual podium before.

The resident of Insep, and member of the VGA Saint-Maur (Val-de-Marne) club, only points to 47e world rank. Far behind his two compatriots present in Tokyo, Yannick Borel (6e) and Alexandre Bardenet (11e). Suffice to say that imagining him going so far was a colossal surprise. Especially since he owed his selection to his team performances, and not to those in individual, to say the least since he had never climbed on an international podium without his little comrades by his side. His best result was a 7e place at a World Cup event in Vancouver on February 8, 2019. But with the health crisis, world fencing has gone almost a year and a half without competition, which has undoubtedly made it possible to reshuffle the cards and open up the field of possibilities. Cannone is the best example of this with his formidable feat.

He is studying in Master

Throughout his career, Cannone never stopped studying, especially in the United States where he was at university. Since his return to France from Insep, he has also joined a Parisian school, SKEMA, where he follows a “Master in Audit, Management Control and Information Systems“. “I very much appreciate the understanding and support of SKEMA on my double project: high level athlete and higher education», He explained on the school website. “I benefit from adjustments to my course, shifting periods of internship… This allows me to devote myself fully to the periods of preparation and competition. This flexibility and the support of my teachers are a real plus. I live and train at INSEP and I jump in the RER A as soon as possible to join my classes.“