fencing

fencing, PRESS RELEASES

For Immediate Release: Brooklyn Fencer Jaclyn Khrol Top 8 in World Championship, #13 in World


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Misha Mokretsov, info.nyfa@gmail.com, (347) 741-1343

BROOKLYN FENCER JACLYN KHROL TOP 8 IN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, #13 IN WORLD

Brooklyn, NY (April 30, 2021) – Jaclyn Khrol (Bensonhurst, Midwood High School) competed for the first time in the Junior (under-20) World Championship in Cairo, Egypt earlier this month, and rose to 13th in the world after her top 8 result in the most prominent international competition in the sport of fencing, after the Olympic Games.

Khrol has been fencing since she was nine years old and has had consistent success from the age of 10, with countless medals at North American Cups, Summer Nationals, and Junior Olympics, as well as World Cups. But in 2019, Khrol was crushed when she was just one spot away from making the National Team. “It was very hard to keep her inspired and motivated to start training again,” said her coach, Misha Mokretsov (New York Fencing Academy, Brooklyn, NY). “Jackie was so successful from a young age, that in her mind, she would make the National Team. But when it didn’t happen, it was very shocking for her.” The next year, the story repeated and again she was one spot short. “That was so disappointing,” said Khrol, “plus COVID started and I wasn’t able to train for 8 months.” That is an extremely long time to stop training for an athlete of her level. As soon as it was allowed, they started training again and it became obvious that she had a lot of work to do to get back in shape to the level needed for major events.

Then the good news came. Khrol recalled, “I was thrilled to learn that the World Championships were happening and I finally got selected for the team!” They had a very short time to prepare, but with a sharp training plan and Khrol’s experience, the student and coach created the best momentum they could for the 2021 World Championships.

“Jackie was a little uncomfortable going to her dream event after such a long break, but what she lacked in training, we knew she could cover with her mental game, experience and strategic thinking,” said coach Mokretsov.

The day of the competition, Khrol carried out her routine and looked ready. She started off winning her first bout confidently. For the second bout, Khrol began ahead 4-1 and finished 5-3. Next, against Carmen Andrea Correa Santa from Colombia, Khrol started winning 2-0 and later in the bout received 2 touches against her before realizing that her weapon wasn’t working. That threw off Khrol’s focus and she lost the bout in priority 2-3.

Even though she tried to get back in the zone, Khrol was still affected by the last bout and lost the next two bouts to athletes from Poland and Spain. Finally, Khrol managed to regain her confidence and won one more bout, finishing the pool round at 3-3. She ranked 58th out of 113 fencers.

In direct elimination, Khrol dominated her first bout against Kamilia Abdyl-Khamitova from Kyrgyzstan, even though it ended with a close 15-13 score. Next, Khrol faced an extremely hard opponent, Kinga Zgryzniak from Poland, who ranked 7th after pools and didn’t lose a single pool bout. Khrol was behind through most of the bout, but near the end with 18 seconds left and 2 points behind, she scored a touch and got to 11-12. Mokretsov recalled, “She had 5 seconds left to catch up and managed to do it when the clock had only .007 seconds remaining! Then in overtime, she won! That was an amazing bout and it put Jackie in a strong mindset for the next bout.”

To make top 16, Khrol fenced Olexandra Lazarenko from Ukraine and built a comfortable lead from the beginning, finishing 13-8. For top 8, Khrol faced a strong athlete from Egypt, Rodaina Gaafar. Again, Khrol was leading the whole bout and never let the opponent doubt her advantage. The final score was 15-12. To make top 4, Khrol had to face another Ukrainian athlete, Anastasiia Zelentsova. Khrol started ahead and kept it up until the last 15 seconds where she had a 3 point lead. At this point. Khrol started fencing too carefully and tried to save the lead rather than fence actively to keep the pressure on the opponent. Zelentsova fought up to a 1 point deficit with 5 seconds left. The plan was to retreat and pretend to defend but instead attack when the distance got close. But under the pressure, Khrol tried defense and Zelentsova evened up the score and won in priority. Khrol said, “I’m happy I made top 8 in my first junior world championship and moved up to 13th in world rankings! I have two more years in juniors and I’m seriously focused on beating this result!”

New York Fencing Academy (NYFA) was founded in 2010 in Brooklyn, NY by owner and head coach Misha Mokretsov. In 2018, NYFA opened their second location in Port Washington, Long Island, NY. NYFA is a center for excellence in epee, with one of the strongest competitive epee programs in the country. NYFA has produced National and World Champions, and has members on the USA and French national teams. NYFA provides private lessons, group classes, after school programs, and camps for students of all ages and all levels, beginners to advanced. Visit http://www.fencenyfa.com for more info.

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Contact: Misha Mokretsov, , cell phone: (347) 741-1343
Company: New York Fencing Academy
Brooklyn: 2896 W 12th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11224, club phone: (718) 996-0426
Long Island: 8 Haven Avenue, Port Washington, NY 11050, club phone: (516) 472-7042

info.nyfa@gmail.com

www.fenceNYFA.com  

fencing, PRESS RELEASES

For Immediate Release: World Championship Bronze Medal for New York Fencer Skyler Liverant


Brooklyn, NY (April 15, 2021) –  The World Championships is the most prominent international competition in the sport of fencing, after the Olympic Games. Only three fencers from each country qualify to participate. For 17-year-old Skyler Liverant (Kensington, Brooklyn Prospect Charter School), this was his second World Championship in the Cadet (17 and under) age group, and his experience paid off with a bronze medal finish in Cairo, Egypt last week. 

Liverant’s coach, Misha Mokretsov at New York Fencing Academy, recalls, “when Skyler competed two years ago in the World Championship in Poland, he was only 15 years old fencing against opponents two years older, and he was overwhelmed by the magnitude of the event. This time, Skyler came fully prepared and knew what to expect.”

“I felt really confident,” Liverant confirmed. “I was practicing really well and was mentally prepared. Having been there before, I knew how I needed to approach the competition to win.”  The COVID-19 protocols didn’t seem to faze him either. Athletes remained in a “bubble” from arrival at the airport and throughout the competition. “On one hand it was hard to stay in the hotel all the time” said Liverant “but I think it also helped us to focus on the competition.”

Liverant started off feeling a little nervous and tight and lost the first pool bout by one touch. After discussing his mistakes with coach Mokretsov, he took off, fencing free and easy and winning the remaining bouts in his pool. He finished the pool round 14th out of 100 athletes. 

In the direct elimination round, Liverant first faced Krystof Pohnan from Czech Republic. Liverant was flawless, leading 14-0 and he finished the bout with a double touch to make 15-1. In his bout for top 16 against Lukin Bogdan from Kazakhstan, Liverant started confidently and held his lead throughout to lock in a 15-7 win. 

For Liverant, the most significant bout of the day was for top 8 when he had to beat fellow American, Henry Lawson. “It’s always a lot of pressure to fence a teammate at an international competition, especially World Championships,” Liverant said.  Lawson was ranked third after pools, and both fencers knew each other very well. It all came down to who could change the game enough to surprise the opponent. They fenced evenly to 7-7, then Liverant built a comfortable lead and won 15-9. 

The next bout determined whether Liverant would make top 4 and earn a medal. His competitor was Markus Salm from Estonia, whom Liverant fenced and beat in the pool round. Coach Mokretsov’s main advice was to not underestimate his opponent just because he beat him in the pools. Liverant was winning 13-8 and then lost 3 touches in a row. His lead narrowed to 13-11 and his coach intervened, changing tactics to attack more aggressively so as not to give too much freedom to the opponent. Liverant succeeded, won 15-12, and earned a medal. 

To make the finals, Liverant had to fence in the semifinals against a very strong fencer, Artem Sarkisyan from Russia. Liverant started to attack early in the match which was not the right strategy. Sarkisyan was very comfortable defending and with his lead, did not need to attack. With a strong performance, Liverant ended the day with the bronze medal, adding to USA’s success at this World Championship. 

“Skyler fenced his heart out,” said coach Mokretsov. “He really deserves this medal for all his hard work over the past eight years, his dedication and love for the sport of fencing, and very importantly his personal qualities – honesty, loyalty and diligence. It’s a beautiful way to finish the cadet age level and I know it will only inspire him to achieve greater results in the future.” 

New York Fencing Academy (NYFA) was founded in 2010 in Brooklyn, NY by owner and head coach Misha Mokretsov.  In 2018, NYFA opened their second location in Port Washington, Long Island, NY.  NYFA is a center for excellence in epee, with one of the strongest competitive epee programs in the country. NYFA has produced National and World Champions, and has members on the USA and French national teams.  NYFA provides private lessons, group classes, after school programs, and camps for students of all ages and all levels, beginners to advanced. Visit www.fencenyfa.com for more info.

###

Contact: Misha Mokretsov, , cell phone: (347) 741-1343

Company: New York Fencing Academy

Brooklyn: 2896 W 12th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11224, club phone: (718) 996-0426

Long Island: 8 Haven Avenue, Port Washington, NY 11050, club phone: (516) 472-7042

info.nyfa@gmail.com

www.fenceNYFA.com  

BLOG, CLUB NEWS, fencing, Parents

The Online World of Fencing!


By Sergey Danilov

The new world and the new reality came fast and, surely, unexpectedly. While we’re all adapting to the new way of life, looking out of the window, and thinking: “Is it real?” – we have to continue our routines as much as we can – this will be over at some point. We just have to be patient and positive!

Well, the new reality came to the fencing community, and as we’re all adapting to the new ways of studying, shopping, etc., we also have to adapt to how to exercise, stay in physical and fencing shape the best possible ways. The main question I have right now from some of the fencers – “will I get worse during this quarantine?” My answer will be: “It is up to you, in fact you still can get better, and remember the entire WORLD is in the similar situation”

So, moving on, I would suggest a few things to keep in mind and prepare for the new world of online training and be ready to come to the gym (don’t you miss gym and your Coach more than ever?)

1. Stay positive!

It is important, even though sometimes it is hard. And when I say positive, I don’t mean just the smile on the face. Remember, each situation has a solution – you just have to find it. The best example – creating the target – a) put the pillow in the jacket, zip the jacket b) tie the strap (so the pillow does not fall out) c) hang it against the wall on the hanger. Target is ready! Can not come up with the solution? Sometimes it is simply a lack of experience – talk to your Coach, I am sure they are full of ideas!

2. Safety, safety, safety!

Assuming you are getting positive and then moving to training… but remember, SAFETY FIRST. Unfortunately, we Coaches cannot control as much as we could during training in the gym, so please make sure that you listen for the coaches’ guidelines and warnings. Communicate with the Coaches any concerns or worries.

  • Before each online class, prepare the space (ask coaches how much space you would need for the upcoming class)
  • Make all the equipment ready and keep it near you in a safe place.
  • Wear appropriate attire (yes, even at home, even online – it is exercise and you should wear clothes appropriate to exercise).
  • Make sure there are no objects around you to harm during the exercises.

3. Space for online fencing training

What is a good space at these challenging times? Well, make your imagination work, maybe it is time to rearrange the furniture in your home. I heard it is good to move the furniture from time to time, and you will spend quality time with your loved ones Or you already have it? Great! But generally speaking:

  • Hardwood floors will work perfectly!
  • Have a garage? Haven’t you planned to organize it for a while? This is a great place as well. I would suggest preparing some floor mat, as I am sure your Coach will have some exercises on the floor.
  • If you have a basement covered with carpet? Well this is great (short carpet though will be the best and it will take no time to adjust)!
  • Otherwise be creative, and always consult with the coach and remember – SAFETY FIRST!

4. Your coach should definitely see you!

Another important point I notice during classes – the position of your device with the camera as well as the position of yourself, is important. Remember, while these are challenging times for you, these are challenging times for us Coaches as well.

This is the time where we can not come and correct you using some tools we used to do in the gym. So, make sure, when the Coach looks at you – he/she sees your entire posture, not your head and ceiling or your sibling doing homework.

Also, think of what is the most important for your Coach to see. Usually when you stay sideways, the Coach has a better opportunity to control your position and is able to give correction if needed.

And yes, we know that most of you are using the same devices for homework, so please don’t forget to charge the devices for the lesson – you really don’t want to miss those words of wisdom from your favorite master!

5. Behavior

I guess this will be our new world and we need a new code of conduct… Wait, nothing changes online. All we have to do is show respect to each other:

  • Show up for the class on time, so your Coach does not have to get distracted from explaining or showing the exercises by admitting you to the online room. At the end of the day, the excuse “there was an accident on the road and a lot of traffic…” does not work anymore.
  • Yes, it is online, but still, greet your Coach and maybe a simple“how are you” will be a great way to start the class.
  • NO CHAT! Have a question? Signal your Coach and I am sure the Coach will be happy to answer. But leave the chatting with friends for after or before the class. Remember it is challenging for Coaches as well to be able to provide quality instruction over the internet – respect this and listen instead of chatting.
  • Ask your family to stay away from the space and let you concentrate on your Coach and exercises, meaning no party or movie night around.
  • Make sure you “mute” yourself on the online platform during the class unless you need to ask a question. The main reason for that – every time you produce some noise – everyone sees you not the Coach. So if for some reason the Coach forgot to mute you – you always can do it yourself.

6. Equipment

As for equipment, I would really speak to the Coach before each class if you need something specific. Otherwise:

  • Small towel would be nice. I found the online classes more intense as there are almost no breaks, social breaks, hiding in the changing room, playing on the phone etc. So be ready to sweat a lot.
  • Bottle of water. I said almost none, so I am sure the Coach will give you some breaks. But during these classes, breaks are short, so making a trip to the kitchen might cause you to miss some important information.
  • Floor mat for exercises. Again, you can be creative on this one if you don’t have it or you may find one in an online store.

And did I mention to stay positive? As I said earlier, this will be over – meanwhile, stay connected to your Coaches, keep yourself in shape, focus on something you can improve right now and you will improve as a fencer… competitive shape? We will get it back quickly as long as we keep training!

fencing, RESULTS

February Results: Junior Olympic Champion & Top 32 + SJCC/RJCC/RYC Medalists


So many medals and events that it’s hard to track! Here are some of the weekend results! Good job everyone!
Cadet RJCC – Mia Smotritsky top 8!
Y14 RYC – Mia Smotritsky top 8!
Y12 RYC
Landon Shchur – silver medal 🥈
Nick Iarikov – bronze medal 🥉
David Dodin – top 8!
Y10 RYC – Liora Profis – silver medal 🥈
#fencenyfa #teamnyfa #gonyfa #ryc #rjcc

 

Congratulations to Josh Yavorovskiy taking bronze medal at SJCC in Baltimore and earning C2020!  #fencenyfa #teamnyfa #medalist #C2020 #sjcc

 

Congratulations to Liza Zigalo with bronze medal in Y14 Jersey Clash!
And Mitchell Pozovskiy with top 8 finish! #teamnyfa #fencenyfa #ryc #jerseyclash #medalist

 

Congratulations to our fencers at JO’s:
Isabella Chin – top 16 in Cadets
Ethan Kushnerik – top 16 in Juniors
Rachel Kowalsky – top 32 in Juniors
#teamnyfa #gonyfa #fencenyfa #juniorolympics

 

First day of JO’s and we can’t be more proud! There were 333 fencers competing in cadets men’s epee!
Ethan Kushnerik – National Champion!
Mitchel Bekker – top 16!
Great job guys – very happy for you and looking forward juniors event!
#fencenyfa #teamnyfa #juniorolympics2020 #juniorolympicschampion

 

Great job everyone who earned medals this weekend at Thrust RYC and RJCC!
Y10 girls – Liora Profis – 7th place!
Y10 boys:
Max Brodetsky – 3rd place!
Alexander Ratmansky – 7th place!
Y12 girls:
Erica Kovalchuk – 5th place!
Alexandra Rakhovski – 7th place!
Y12 boys:
David Dodin – 6th place!
Finn Chimoskey – 7th place!
Ethan Zaydman – 8th place!
Y14 girls – Elizabeth Zigalo – 2nd place!
Juniors girls – Rachel Kowalsky – 3rd place!
#gonyfa #teamnyfa #fencenyfa #ryc #rjcc #medalists