Brooklyn NY fencing

PRESS RELEASES, RESULTS

For Immediate Release: Brooklyn Trained Fencer Places 12th at His First Junior World Championship in Verona, Italy


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Brooklyn, NY (April 2, 2018) – First-time Junior World Championship Team member, 17-year-old, Alan Temiryaev, took 12th place in the individual epee competition on the first day of the Junior and Cadet World Championships in Verona, Italy.

Temiryaev, a member of last year’s Cadet World Team, defeated Marin Atanasov (BUL), 15-11, and Fynn Fafard (CAN), 14-11, to advance to the 32.

“I just came in feeling really confident. I was inspired by some other fencers who believe that if you believe you can do it, then you can do it,” Temiryaev said. “That was my mentality, especially against Fafard, where the score was touch for touch. I just believed I had to be stronger and more dominant and if I just believed in myself like I did, I just got those touches. It’s all about confidence and pulling through.”

After easily taking the bout against Goncalo Alves (POR), 15-5, Temiryaev faced Davide Di Veroli (ITA), the 2017 Cadet World Champion. Temiryaev kept the bout close, but at 9-8, Di Veroli put up three straight single touches and used the momentum to win, 15-10. Di Veroli went on to claim the silver in the event. Temiryaev will be back in action on Monday as part of the Cadet World Team.

“This is my first Junior World Championships and I hope there will be many more. I’m quite pleased with my result,” Temiryaev said. “Of course we would have wanted to do more and achieve as much as possible, but you know your limits and then for next year you work harder to achieve those limits.”

Temiryaev is a student at New York Fencing Academy in Coney Island, Brooklyn, NY. He has been training with Coach Misha Mokretsov since he began fencing at age 10.

New York Fencing Academy (NYFA) was founded in 2010 by owner and head coach Misha Mokretsov and is located in the Coney Island neighborhood of Brooklyn, NY. NYFA has quickly become a center for excellence in epee, with one of the strongest competitive epee programs in the country. NYFA has been ranked #1 in youth epee and Fencing Club of the Year by National Fencing Club Rankings, and has produced National and World Champions, and has members on the USA cadet and junior national teams and French junior national team. NYFA provides private lessons, group classes, day camps, and the biggest Summer epee camp in the US. Visit http://www.fencenyfa.com for more info.

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Contact: Misha Mokretsov
Company: New York Fencing Academy
Address: 2896 W 12th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11224
Club Phone: (718) 996-0426
Cell Phone: (347) 741-1343
info.nyfa@gmail.com
http://www.fenceNYFA.com

Alan Temiryaev (left) 12th in World Championships Juniors Verona, Italy 1 april 2018 pc: Trifiletti / Bizzi
RESULTS

NYFA YOUTH CHAMPIONS, SYC SEASON TOP MEDALIST + MORE RESULTS


Congratulations to our athletes for their recent fencing achievements!

  • Nadia Gaberkorn – Most SYC Medals won this season of all fencers in all weapons! 2 Golds, 1 Silver, 3 Bronze & 3 more top 8’s.
  • Nathan Vaysberg – 2 Gold Medals earned in 1 day! Fencer’s Club Junior Men’s Epee and NY Athletic Club’s Mercury Cup 1-Touch.
  • Ethan Kushnerik – B2017 rating at Fencer’s Club Senior Men’s Epee Grand Prix

NYFA Youth Cup Challenge 2016-2017 Season Winners:

Champions:

  • Julian Brodsky – Y8
  • Shawn Agaon – Y10
  • Ian Goldfine – Y12
  • Jaclyn Khrol – Y14

2nd Place:

  • Ethan Zaydman – Y8
  • Dylan Kats – Y10
  • Anna Temiryaev – Y12
  • David Pavlenishvili – Y14

3rd Place:

  • Finn Chimoskey – Y8
  • Ethan Agaon – Y10
  • David Pavlenishvili – Y12
  • Mitchel Bekker – Y14

Click here for NYFA Youth Cup full season results

Click here for more recent Top 8 results

Go NYFA!

RESULTS

3 GOLD, 3 SILVER, 3 BRONZE + 2 TOP 8 AT MISSION SYC


NYFA athletes earned 11 medals and Coach Mokretsov took home 3 coach medals at the Mission SYC .  Way to finish the SYC season!  Congratulations to all!

  • Nadia Gaberkorn – Gold in Y14 and Gold in Y12!
  • Ethan Kushnerik – Gold in Y14
  • Daniel Gaidar – Silver in Y14
  • Bobby Gubin – Silver in Y12
  • Ian Goldfine – Silver in Y10, Bronze in Y12
  • Anna Temiryaev – Bronze in Y14
  • Joshua Yavoroskiy – Bronze in Y10
  • Skyler Liverant – 6th in Y14
  • David Pavlenishvili – 6th in Y12

Click here for the final touch in the all-NYFA Y14 finals: Kushnerik vs Gaidar

Go NYFA!!

 

RESULTS

RESULTS: FAIRFAX SYC, JEFF WOLFE ROC, APRIL NAC, AMERICAN RJCC


Congratulations to all of our fencers who earned these recent top results!

Fairfax Challenge SYC:

  • Caralina Khrol – Gold in Y12, 5th in Y14
  • Skyler Liverant – Bronze in Y14
  • Shawn Agaon – Bronze in Y10
  • Nadia Gaberkorn – 5th in Y12
  • Ian Goldfine – 6th in Y10
  • Peter Kambeseles – 7th & E2017 in Y14

Jeff Wolfe Long Island Challenge ROC:

  • Nathan Vaysberg – Silver in Div1A
  • Andrew Mufel – Silver in Div2
  • Mark Dolgonos – 6th in Div1A & A2017!
  • Alan Slavinskiy – 6th in Div2

April NAC:

  • Ed Mufel – 5th in Vet-50 Foil, 10th in Vet-50 Epee
  • Ruben Grigoryan – 22 in Vet-70
  • Anna Lanzman – 31 in Division 1
  • Yuriy Chelnitsky – 32 in Vet-50

Jack Kambeseles – 8th and D2017 at American Challenge RJCC

Click here for these and other top 8 results on Askfred

Go NYFA!

IN THE NEWS

CONEY ISLAND FENCING CHAMP WINS GOLD IN DRAMATIC FINAL BOUT


http://bklyner.com/coney-island-fencing-champ-wins-gold-dramatic-final-bout/

BKLYNER
March 2, 2017
Carly Miller

NYFA NY Fencing Club Brooklyn
Alan Temiryaev wins 2017 Junior Olympic National Championship
in Junior Men’s Epee. pc: USA Fencing

Victory moment for 16-year-old Alan Temiryaev.

A disciplined but fun-loving sophomore at James Madison High School is setting records for fencing and laser-sharp focus — from the fencing academy in Coney Island to championships around the world.

In February, Alan Temiryaev, back from a debilitating knee injury, nabbed the Gold in the Junior Olympics in a spectacular and dramatic bout. And at 16 years old, he is one of the youngest to win the Junior (under-20) age category, beating out 301 competitors this year.

This young fencer has quite the accolade list already: The event, held in Missouri, earned Temiryaev a National Championship medal and locked his spot on the USA National Team to compete in the World Championships. (He already won two bronze medals at World Cups in Austria and France.)

The winning moment

Over the long day, Temiryaev faced many challengers in multiple bouts, including previous champions. But by the final match, both competitors were exhausted and cramping, said Temiryaev. “It was all about willpower. We were both tired, we woke up at 6am and it was 6pm already and competing for this last touch.”

Temiryaev started off this bout losing and couldn’t catch up — until the very last moment.

With just 20 seconds left and trailing 4-6, Temiryaev pulled out his skillful combination of touches and a unique perseverance and won in overtime seconds with a score of 7–6.

“They both couldn’t move anymore. Most people thought it was over. But he’s famous for bringing bouts back from bad situations,” said Coach Misha Mokretsov. “With Alan, I never know what’s going to happen!”

alan-temiryaev-center-coaches-misha-mokretsov-left-yarik-ponomarenko-right-temiryaev-wins-2017-junior-olympic-national-championship-in-junior-mens-epee
Alan Temiryaev (center), Coach Misha Mokretsov (left) (Photo via NYFA)

And Temiryaev was flying solo, since the final bout took place far from the coaches seating area. “The students cannot hear and you can coach only in the break. He was on his own. It was his own willpower,” he said.

A unique blend of strategy, confidence, and courage

Temiryaev has been fencing since he was 10 years old, under the tutelage of Coach Misha Mokretsov of Coney Island’s New York Fencing Academy.

“At first, I had no idea it would be this much fun,” Temiryaev told BKLYNER, detailing the skills for when to attack and how, using the different rules of each weapon. “It’s strategic and competitive, with discipline involved.”

“Most of the time I observe a fencer before I fence them, and if he’s aggressive I’ll use that to my advantage,” he said. “But sometimes, I react in the moment.”

NY Fencing club Brooklyn Epee
Alan Temiryaev wins 2017 Junior Olympic National Championship in Junior Men’s Epee. (Photo via NYFA)

Temiryaev loves to win but also sees great value in losing. “Last year at the nationals I lost to some crazy guy from the college level world team,” he said. “I got destroyed, but this year it was fun to realize I’m the one who’s winning in that age group.”

Coach Mokretsov saw something special in Temiryaev right away, he said. “He started like a regular kid, but in little less than a year he got second place at Summer Nationals for 10 and younger — which was surprising because he was a beginner,” said Mokretsov, whose Coney Island-based fencing academy (NYFA) has one of the strongest competitive epee programs in the country.

He attributes some of that to technique and skill, but even more so to mental strength.

“He managed to overcome pressure and scored complex actions, which requires fine execution and takes a lot of courage — even without pressure,” said Mokretsov.

“I’ve been coaching for 10 years and have had a lot of good kids,” said Mokretsov. “But usually they are tense when it comes to close bouts. But Alan does better under pressure. That’s what makes him unique. Many people can have a good day when it’s easy, but when you’re not having a good day — which happens a lot in our sport — it’s psychological, and opponent matches play a big role,” he said.

Before coaching, Mokretsov fenced on the Ukranian National Team and came to the US to attend St. John’s University on the NCAA team. “I still know how it feels to be an athlete,” he said. “And I love working with kids because they always raise my mood. They’re always positive and open to the challenge.”

Next, Temiryaev will travel with his coach, Misha Mokretsov, to compete at the World Championships in Bulgaria in April.

For young fencers, Temiryaev has this advice:

“Definitely keep trying no matter what. I lost so many times before I won.”